Heart’s Content- The Fishing Village That Changed the World

visiting-hearts-contentThe little Newfoundland community of Heart’s Content changed the world forever!  cable-station-hearts-contentWe visited the old cable station in Heart’s Content, now a museum that tells the story of how electronic communication between Europe and North America was first established in a tiny Newfoundland fishing village. leaving-ireland-with-cableIn 1866 a huge ship called the Great Eastern left Valentia Ireland with 2730 nautical miles of cable in her hold.

Dave checks out a model of the Great Eastern

Dave checks out a model of the Great Eastern

ship-that-towed-the-cableIn just fourteen days the Great Eastern and its crew laid that cable at the bottom of the ocean and reached Heart’s Content in Newfoundland establishing the first permanent telegraphic communication across the Atlantic.

You can still see parts of the cables sticking out on the shore in Heart's Content just across from the cable station

You can still see parts of the cables sticking out on the shore in Heart’s Content just across from the cable station

Subsequently five more cables were laid and the station in Heart’s Content kept them all operational.

The machinery of the cable station was preserved after the station finally closed in the 1960s

The machinery of the cable station and the station itself was preserved after the station finally closed in 1965

 Those cables changed the world and the little fishing village of Heart’s Content forever providing trans Atlantic communication and a vital link between the continents, something that impacted commerce, trade, finance, personal life, culture and was especially important militarily during the two World Wars.

The cable station provided jobs to 300 people- good steady jobs very different from depending on fishing for an income. It also employed 60 women which was an amazing professional opportunity for women in the early 1900s.

The cable station provided jobs to 300 people- good steady jobs very different from depending on fishing for an income. During the World Wars it also employed 60 Newfoundland women which was an amazing career opportunity for them in the early half of the 1900s.

Our guide shows us samples of the cables that were laid under the ocean

Our guide shows us the way they made the cables that were laid under the ocean. 

Dave reads a plaque that explains how the cable changed Trans Atlantic communication from a time of weeks on letters sent on ships to a matter of hours or minutes

Dave reads a plaque that explains how the Heart’s Content cable changed Trans Atlantic communication from a time of weeks via letters sent on ships to a matter of  minutes via telegraph

Dave stands on a map that shows just how linked by communication cables the world was already in 1901

Dave stands on a map that shows just how linked by communication cables the world was already by 1901

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