Who are the Wendat?

wendat tipiAt one time there were about 25,000 Wendat First Nations people in North America. Wendat lived in 18 to 25 villages, some with up to 3,500 people along the shores of Lake Ontario.  Between 1634 and 1642 they were reduced to about 9,000 by a series of epidemics, measles, influenza and smallpox brought by the French. The French called the Wendat, the Huron.  dream catcher wendatAfter a war with the Iroquois a remnant of the Wendat people dispersed to different places in North America. One group ended up not far from where Quebec City is located today.  We visited a Wendat village set up for tourists when we were in Quebec. Dave and his cousin John had a long talk with one of the members of the tribe who was acting as a guide.  john and dave talk to huron guide
The present population of the Wendat,  near Québec City, is about 3,000. The majority are Catholic and use French as their first language.wendat long houseThe Wendat once lived in long houses which were up to 7 meters wide and 90 meters in length and housed extended families that traced a common descent to the same mother or grandmother.wendat village

High palisades around the villages offered protection.
wendat canoe

The Wendat traveled in birch bark canoes along the St. Lawrence River. wendat art workStory telling was important to the Wendat and they often used art to tell those stories. 

 

wendat fursThe Wendat were one of the most important suppliers of furs to the French exchanging their furs for goods from the French. dave and john talk to huron guideThe Wendat have lost their original language. At the site of their reconstructed village near Quebec City they are doing their best to preserve at least a part of their culture and heritage and share that knowledge with those who come to visit. 

Other posts………

Hopi at the Heard

Killing a Bison is Hard

Dave’s Vision Quest

Leave a comment

Filed under Canada, History, quebec city

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s